“Introducing Dawn Chorus”

A museum-based alarm clock app. Looks great! I’m giving it a go..

“Mobile technology has changed the way we interface with museums. Nowadays, institutions are looking for compelling ways to digitize and deliver collections to users on the popular devices we carry with us each day. For example, museum visits can be simulated by browsing online collections or downloading audio guide apps. However, many of these approaches contain a high level of friction (discovery, download, etc.) and lack the basic elements of engagement required to draw users back on a consistent basis.”

https://studio.carnegiemuseums.org/dawn-chorus-ec5d2a25df7a

Technobiophilia at the Edinburgh International Science Festival @EdSciFest 16 April 2017

Technobiophilia comes to the Edinburgh International Science Festival

Sunday 16 April 2017, 12:30 — 14:00
National Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh.

Why do we feel the need to unplug, or sign up for a digital detox? Join us to investigate the research and ideas behind the effects of technology and nature on our health.

Wired Nature

Join digital wellbeing expert Sue Thomas, and a panel including a psychologist and an app developer, as we investigate the research and ideas behind the effects of technology and nature on our health. We will look at the effects of wired nature on our brains, study the benefits of a natural world experienced in digital form and find out how we deal with an overload of information.

Tickets
Supported by The British Psychological Society
Source: Wired Nature – Edinburgh International Science Festival

Can you sense where north is? These people can.

Whenever I spend time in the USA  or Canada I’m always intrigued by the way they use compass points for directions. “Go north three blocks, then east two blocks,” helpful people tell me. They assume I know which direction north is, but I don’t have a clue. In the UK we’ve never located ourselves that way. I’m always baffled at how North Americans  actually know which way east or west is. I’m aware it’s often written on street signs, but I’m sure that people are deeply familiar with it in their own neighbourhoods. To me, it seems like a magical sixth sense.

But now I, too, can know where north is. Not just know it, but feel it. Liviu Babitz and Scott Cohen, co-founders of Cyborg Nest, have developed North Sense, “a miniature Artificial Sense, vibrating each time it faces the Magnetic North. Your North Sense will not depend on an internet, it’s a standalone artificial sensory organ, coated in the highest quality body-compatible materials”.

It sounds very exciting: “Our New Sensory Organs take inspiration from animals and nature. Designed by world experts, they require minimal invasion into the body. Once attached, a whole new range of experiences and emotions are unlocked.”

Josie Thaddeus-Johns  met the pair, and saw North Sense in the flesh, as it were. She described how Liviu Babitz opened his collar to reveal a small silicone gadget, the size of a matchbox, attached to his chest with two titanium bars that sit just under the skin. Most resembling a compact bike light, the North Sense that Babitz has attached is an artificial sense organ that delivers a short vibration every time the user faces North. Her article is long, intriguing and well worth the read. Find out more at The Guardian.

 

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