Tag Archives: health

What’s The Point Of Artificial Plants? #technature

Fake Nature

Lately I’ve felt very tempted to buy a fake tree for my apartment but there’s a tiny voice in my head warning me off. Sacrilege, it’s saying! The thin end of the wedge! Soon you’ll find yourself replacing all your real plants with plastic and your soul will wither. But, I don’t know. I really like the idea of an indoor tree, and a real one is not only expensive but, knowing my poor nurturing skills, would almost certainly die slowly and horribly over a fairly short period of time.

Leaves – Real And Fake

At the moment, a corner of my home looks like this  (right). The plants in the foreground are real but behind them is a Walplus Wallsticker picture of a tree with falling leaves scattered across the wall.  It felt like a huge risk when I first did it but the transfer was very inexpensive and could easily be taken off if I didn’t like it. But, I do like it. And maybe there’s a good reason for that…

Nearby Nature

In Technobiophilia, I wrote about the power of ‘nearby nature’ as described by R. & S. Kaplan in their important book The Experience of Nature (1989) (hard to find, check your library).

Instances of nearby nature are small suggestions of the natural world which, although seemingly insignificant and often out of physical reach, can play a powerful role in human well-being. Even the sight of a few trees viewed through a window can provide a sense of satisfaction and people with access to nearby natural settings have been found to be healthier than those without; studies show they experience increased levels of satisfaction with their home, job and life in general. Nearby nature does not have to be beautiful or complex, and you do not even have to be physically close to it to gain the benefits. It appears to be just as potent when viewed through a closed window or seen pictorially via a photograph, painting, video, or even something as mundane as a wall calendar.

The Kaplans didn’t express any opinions about fake greenery, but it seems to me that as long as it’s done well it must surely fall into the category of nearby nature.

So This Is The Fake Tree I’ve Been Thinking About

An artificial weeping fig, made from polyethylene plastic, 170cm tall. I saw it in the store, and felt its leaves.

It’s kind of fabric-y, not cool and living, and the ‘wood’ is pretty badly done. but from a distance it’s a kind of mirage of a tree.

I think I could live with it. Any advice?

Would it bring a breath of nearby nature?

Emotional Connections

There is a little-known design discipline devoted to helping us feel closer to the natural world. It’s called biophilic design and Professor Tim Beatley is one of the best-known researchers in that area. He leads the international Biophilic Cities Network.

In a recent blog post, Tending To Our Interior Nature(s), Beatley advises choosing objects and furnishings with meaningful stories, connections, relationships with real nature. He also recommends nature-themed art, explaining the personal benefits he has gained from photographs:

Nature-themed art is now commonly found in many hospitals and offices, and can both help to elicit positive feelings and jog memories of earlier nature experiences. I have framed photos of Half Dome, in Yosemite, for instance, and Monument Valley, Utah. These forms of interior nature are beneficial in themselves and enjoyable to look at, but also embody important memories and mental connections that can be activated with the slightest gaze or pondering. While not every time I look at these photos, but quite often, they have the effect of taking me back to the time and place, and sensations and family connections that I associate with those memories.

He offers lots of interesting examples of ways in which interior decor of all kinds can enhance our relationship with nature, using natural materials like water, wood and stone., although I must admit that, like the Kaplans, he makes no mention of plastic wall transfers or polyethylene trees.

Shall I go ahead and get that tree? Still can’t decide…

My New Knees: On The Way To Being Cyborg

“My new knee is called a Genesis II, a whimsical name that connotes an entirely new species cooked up from metal and plastic. Its principle components are cobalt chromium molybdenum alloy, titanium, and polyethylene. Polyethylene is the scourge of our oceans and landfills; titanium, though, is less alien. Mined from deep in the earth, it’s found in most living things…”

“Has the installation of my new knee – my crossing over into the world of cyborgs – changed me in any way? It’s difficult to say…”

The two short excerpts above are from my latest piece in the American environmental magazine Orion. It’s behind a firewall so I can’t share the whole thing, but subscribers will find it on pp12-13 in the March/April 2016 issue. Since writing it, I’ve had a second operation and now have two replacement knees. I’ve been fascinated by cyborgs, and written about them, for over twenty years, so I’ve found the whole process very significant.  And I’m in complete agreement with the cyborg artist Neil Harbisson who says:

“I don’t feel that I’m using technology. I don’t feel that I’m wearing technology. I feel that I am technology.”

Harbisson was born colour-blind but he developed a device which is attached to his head and turns colour into audible frequencies. Most of the popular images of cyborgs are, like Harbisson, striking to look at because their prosthetics are visible on the outside. In recent years we’ve also become used to seeing people wearing prosthetic legs and arms.

But millions of individuals around the world are already quietly cyborg with not much to show for it. Knees, hips, and ankles are routinely replaced in operating theatres every day but there’s nothing to be seen apart from an occasional limp. And most of those new cyborgs aren’t young and cool but, like me, greying and somewhat mature.  Food for thought.

4 Ways To Connect To Your Body (3 x Human, 1 x Dog)

Let’s all get some BarkPoints!

There’s something deeply enjoyable about working online – you feel connected to other people, to your machine, to the vastness of the internet. Don’t know about you, but I can get a real buzz from just sitting at my desk for hours. Typing, Skyping, messaging, writing – the day flies by. BUT. While our minds zoom around in cyberspace, our poor bodies are stuck in a chair for way too long.

That’s why this week I’ve gathered together a few items to help you connect back to your arms, legs, and other fleshy parts. I’m sure your body will thank you for it! So, stand up straight, pay attention to your stressed-out heart, enjoy a walk in the fresh air and, while you’re at it, take the dog with you. All these activities (even the pooch’s) can be monitored and measured so you’ll have plenty of juicy data to play with when you get back. Up you get!

UP24 by Jawbone Wireless Activity and Sleep Tracking Wristband for iOS and Android

I wore one of the earliest UP wristbands for about a year. It tracked my wanderings around the neighbourhood and measured the ups and downs of my sleep. Not only was I wearing something beautifully blue and stylish but I learned a huge amount about my movements.

It didn’t take long before I had a good idea of the distances I walked (or didn’t walk), information which encouraged me to go further than I may have done otherwise. It vibrates to let you know if you’ve been sitting around for too long, but that’s quite pleasant and nicer than a dig in the ribs or a noisy alarm.

In my experience, especially if you’re new to fitness trackers, an UP wristband is definitely worth a try. And it comes in different vibrant colours and sizes, so it looks cool too.

Lumo Lift Posture Coach and Activity Tracker (requires the free Lumo Lift iOS/Android* app)

Lumo Lift

Posture is an important but often forgotten part of our daily lives, say Lumo. With plenty going on in our hectic and busy schedules, it can be a real challenge to practice the mindfulness needed to identify and correct poor posture. With Lumo Lift you can get gentle vibrational reminders for your posture whenever you slouch. Track your posture hours, steps taken, distance travelled and calories burned through the companion iOS, Android or Windows Desktop Lumo Lift app.

The Lumo Lift is a small, lightweight device that is worn just below your collarbone for posture coaching and activity tracking. Using angle displacement as a measure, its biomechanics let you know when you’re slouching with a gentle vibration as a reminder to straighten back up.

FitBark Dog Activity Monitor, Red

FitBark

FitBark, they say, are on a mission to get dogs and humans healthy together. It makes sense. There’s plenty of research to show that it’s good for humans to spend time with animals, so if both are also tracking their activity that seems like a double whammy of benefits!

But seriously, FitBark is “a beautiful sensor that monitors your dog’s daily activity and sleep and turns it into BarkPoints, so you can track progress. It’s a new way to keep your dog (and you!) healthy, explain changes in behavior, make better decisions with your vet, and share memorable moments with friends & family.” Available in 5 colours.

Let’s all get some BarkPoints.

PIP – White – Stress Management Biosensor + Apps. Measure, understand and manage stress

PIP Stress Management Biosensor (White or Black)

I’ve tried out the PIP myself and I really enjoyed it. See my article Changing a landscape with the power of your mind is hugely relaxing.  Since 2014, when that was written, the company has produced more apps for the PIP, including a Personal Stress Management Tracker and Clarity, for body scanning, mantras and counting the breath.

The company claims that Pip can train you to better manage everyday stress by detecting electrodermal activity (EDA) in your fingertips to accurately determine when your body’s relaxing or stressing. It uses to biofeedback to teach you how to visualise stress and try different techniques to learn to control it.

You need to download the free apps in order to use it, and they’re available for both iOS and Android smartphones and tablets. I found it very helpful, so it comes with my personal recommendation.